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TECHNICAL INFORMATION

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TECHNICAL INFORMATION

What is the minimum border size?
Borders must be at least 0.5 pt thick.

Do I need to include margins?
Please don’t! We will add 12 pt margins around your ad in the final layout stage. If you need bigger margins, please inform our graphic artist at addesign@dailypublications.org and adjustments will be done accordingly.

Do I need to include crop marks or a colour bar?
These are not necessary and will be removed in the final version. If you want us to print your ad along with a colour bar, please inform our graphic artist at addesign@dailypublications.org. Note that we will not be able to edit your file at all in this case, so you will be solely responsible for the printed results! Newsprint can be tricky, so please follow our guidelines closely and contact us if you have any questions.

Can I add “bleed”?
No, but you can print seamlessly on two pages if you choose to advertise on the center spread. Please contact us for more information.

Should I use CMYK or RGB?
To avoid unnecessary colour loss, we recommend working from the Adobe RGB (1998) profile and letting us handle the conversion to CMYK. If you are an experienced designer and would like to handle the conversion yourself, you can download our ISO standard color profile, ISONewspaper26v4.icc, available here.

What is the difference between CMYK and RGB?
RGB is the colour mode that your computer monitor uses. It generates colours by adding (R)ed, (G)reen and (B)lue lights to your black monitor, in varying intensities. CMYK is the colour mode that we use when we print colours. It uses (C)yan, (M)agenta, (Y)ellow and blac(K) inks to “subtract” from the brightness of the white paper. Our press uses a special CMYK profile, so we recommend that you create your files in RGB mode and let us handle the conversion to CMYK. For more information, see: What is RGB? What is CMYK? Which colour profile should I use?

Can I use Spot colours? Do I have to pay for CMYK if I use only one colour?
We no longer print Spot colours. Our production costs are the same regardless of how many colours are used, so a standard fee applies.

Can I use Pantone colours?
If you choose to include Pantone colours, you must keep in mind that they will converted to CMYK in the final printing stage. Many Pantone colours are impossible to reproduce faithfully in newsprint (contact addesign@dailypublications.org for the full list). Our graphic artist will replace Pantone colours with a dE index of 5 and above with a CMYK alternative in order to match the original colour as closely as possible. For other colours, the conversion will be done automatically in the final printing stage. If you do not want us to modify your Pantone colours, you must inform our graphic designer as early as possible at addesign@dailypublications.org Note that we will then print your file “as is”; you will be fully responsible for the printed results. Please follow our technical guidelines closely for best results. Important : Transparency or special effects used in conjuction with Pantone colours may generate unexpected results which we cannot control!

Which colour profile should I use? Where can I download your ICC colour profiles?
If you’re not sure how to install colour profiles, we recommend using the default colour profile Adobe RGB (1998) and letting us take care of the CMYK conversion. If you’re familiar with ICC profiles, you may download our ISO standard color profiles, ISONewspaper26v4.icc (for colour ads) and ISONewspaper26v4_gr.icc (for grayscale ads).

What is the minimum highlight?
5%

What is the maximum shadow?
80%

What is the maximum black value?
Cyan: 59%, Magenta: 45%, Yellow: 41%, Black: 95%.

How do I make “rich black”?
Cyan: 30%, Black: 100%.

What is your dot gain and how can I compensate for it?
Our dot gain is 26% for mid-tones; this means a colour at 50% tint will appear to have a 76% tint in newsprint. The best way to compensate for it is to use our ISO standard colour profiles, ISONewspaper26v4.icc (for colour ads) and ISONewspaper26v4_gr.icc (for grayscale ads). If you are not sure how to install custom colour profiles, please use the default colour profile Adobe RGB (1998) and we will take care of the conversion for you. For more information, see : What does dot gain mean?

What is your trapping margin?
Our margin is 0.2 pt. For more information, see : What does trapping mean?

What is the minimum text size?
For dark text on a light background, the minimum size is 12 pt for serif fonts and 7 pt for sans serif fonts. For reverse fonts (pale text on a dark background), the minimum size varies according to the font type and colours used; please contact our graphic designer for assistance at addesign@dailypublications.org. For more information, see : What are Serif, Sans and Sans-Serif fonts?

Should I use a Serif or Sans-Serif font?
In print, it is common is to see Serif fonts used for small text or dense paragraphs, and Sans-Serif or special fonts for large text and titles, while Sans-Serif text seems to be favoured on the Web. There are no set rules; among Serif and Sans-Serif fonts, some are easier to read while others are more eye-catching. How you choose to use them is a matter of personal preference.

How can I avoid blurry text?
The only way to ensure that text will not be blurry is to use a vector font. (See: What does Vector mean?) If using Photoshop, InDesign or Illustrator, leave the text on a separate layer and do not rasterize it. If you use a special font (something other than Arial, Times, Helvetica, Verdana or Trebuchet), please email the font file (usually a .ttf file) directly to our graphic artist at addesign@dailypublications.org

How do I embed a font?
That depends on which program you are using! See our special guidelines for more information.

What is your TAC/ink coverage limit?
Our limit is 240%. For more information, see : What does TAC/ink coverage limit mean?

How can I verify my ink levels?
In Adobe InDesign, you can verify ink levels in the Separations Preview window, which can be found in the Window > Output menu. Change the view to “Ink Limit” and set it to 240%. Areas which are over the limit will be highlighted in red. If you’re not sure, send us your file at addesign@dailypublications.org and we will check it for you.

What causes ink bleeding?
“Ink bleeding” refers to the ink’s tendency to spread on its own due to the capillary action of the paper it rests on. If the ink spreads too much, your text or image will get blurred. Each type of paper has the ability to retain a certain amount of ink. If the paper becomes oversaturated, the ink will have nowhere to go and is likely to run or stain the opposite page as they are pressed together. For this reason, we limit the volume of ink to be used by assigning specific percentages to each color (e.g. 100% Cyan, 30% Yellow, 10% Magenta, 5% Black). The sum of the percentages for every colour must not exceed 240%, which is the ink limit for our newspaper (also known as %ink or TAC limit). For more information, see: How can I verify my ink levels?

How do I know if my file is “high resolution”?
Looking at the file properties should give you a clue; if your file “weighs” less than 100 K, it is most likely at a low resolution. In Photoshop, you can open the file and view its resolution under Image > Image Size… If you’re not sure, send it to our graphic artist at addesign@dailypublications.org and we will check it for you.

How can I increase my file’s resolution?
If your photo is quite large, it may be possible to increase its resolution by condensing it into a smaller, denser area, using a graphics editing program such as Photoshop. See : Special guidelines for Photoshop – How to modify the file resolution.

What happens if I use a lower resolution?
Your ad will be blurry! For the full explanation, see : What does DPI mean?

How can I avoid blurry text?
The only way to ensure that text will not be blurry is to use a vector font. If using Photoshop, Illustrator or InDesign, leave the font on a separate layer and do not rasterize it. If you use a special font (something other than Arial, Times, Helvetica, Verdana or Trebuchet), please email the font file (usually a .ttf file) directly to our graphic artist at addesign@dailypublications.org

Why do the final colours differ from my original file?
There are many possible causes, but the colour profile that you used is the most likely culprit. See: Which colour profile should I use? or consult our Colour section for other important colour management tips.

Why is the size of my ad different from what I had sent you?
Most ads need to be resized in order to match the exact width of your our columns, but the adjustment should be barely noticeable. If the format of your ad was significantly altered, it is likely that the material you sent us did not match the information listed on your purchase order. Please contact one of our sales representatives at 514-398-6790 for assistance.

What causes ink bleeding and how can I avoid it?
“Ink bleeding” refers to the ink’s tendency to spread on its own due to the capillary action of the paper. If the ink spreads too much, your text or image will get blurred. Each type of paper has the ability to retain a certain amount of ink. If the paper becomes oversaturated, the ink will have nowhere to go and is likely to run or stain the opposite page as they are pressed together. For this reason, we limit the volume of ink to be used by setting specific percentages for each colour (e.g. 100% Cyan, 30% Yellow, 10% Magenta, 5% Black). The sum of the percentages for every colour must not exceed 240%, which is the ink limit for our newspaper (also known as %ink or TAC limit). For more information, see: How can I verify my ink levels?

Why are the final transparency or special effects different from my original file?
It’s possible that the transparency was not flattened, or that the effects were rasterized at a low resolution. If you design the file yourself, it is your responsibility to complete these steps. They are described in our special guidelines for Illustrator. Note that Pantone colours used in conjunction with transparency or special effects may generate unexpected results, which we cannot control. If you choose to use Pantone colours, we will print your file “as is”; the printed results will therefore be your own responsibility. For best results, make sure you follow our technical guidelines closely!

Can I use transparency or special effects?
You can use transparency or special effects, but make sure they are flattened and rasterized at a high resolution! (See: special guidelines for Illustrator) Also note that transparency or special effects used in conjunction with Pantone colours may generate unexpected results, which we cannot control. If you choose to use Pantone colours, we will print your file “as is”; the printed results will therefore be your own responsibility. For best results, make sure you follow our technical guidelines closely!

How to flatten transparency
First, select your artwork. In the Object menu, the option “Flatten transparency” will become selectable. Choose the High Resolution preset and uncheck the Preserve Alpha Transparency and the Preserve Overprints and Spot Colors option. To change your presets: in the Edit menu, select Transparency Flattener Presets.

How to rasterize effects
First, select your artwork. In the Object menu, the option “Rasterize…” will become selectable. Set the CMYK colour model to 300 ppi. Make sure the background colour is set to Transparent and that the Anti-aliasing option is set to None. You can also save these preferences: in the Effects menu, select “Document Raster Effects Settings…” and set the CMYK colour model to 300 ppi, the background colour to Transparent and make sure the anti-alias option is unchecked.

How to outline a font
First, select the text you want to outline. In the Font menu, choose “Create Outlines”. Note that we will not be able to modify your text if you choose to outline it. If you use a special font and would like us to be able to modify it, please create a layer (visible) with the outlined font and another layer (invisible) with the editable font; we will use the outlined layer for visual reference and the editable layer if any changes need to be made. You will need to send us the font file (usually a .ttf file) along with your original AI file or editable EPS or PDF. Make sure the Preserve Illustrator Editing Capabilities option is checked when you save the file!

How to set trapping
There are many different things you can do with trapping. Adobe offers a nice tutorial on the topic. You should adjust the trapping width to cover for an error margin of 0.2 pt. Note that trapping is not necessary when both objects contain the same colour (e.g. the Cyan present in a blue object and a purple object will create an automatic trap).

How to set overprint
Select the object which should be set to overprint (the one on top.) In the Attributes panel (Windows > Show Attributes), check the Overprint Fill box. You can set strokes to overprint by checking the Overprint Stroke box. To view your changes, select View > Overprint Preview. The Adobe tutorial for trapping also covers some practical applications of the overprint function. See also : What does Overprint mean?

How to embed images
In the Links panel (Window > Links), select the file which you wish to embed. Right-click and select the Embed option. An icon will appear next to the file name, confirming that it was embedded.

What to do with fonts
InDesign does not allow you to embed fonts in the original .indd document. Instead, it gives you the option to embed all fonts when exporting the file as a PDF. While you may think of your PDF file as a finished (print-ready) product, we will need in fact need to rebuild it so that it complies with our specific colour profiles and PDF settings. Sending us the original .indd file helps prevent unnecessary quality loss due to extra conversion steps. If you have access to the original .indd document, please send it to addesign@dailypublications.org along with any special font files (anything that isn’t Arial, Helvetica, Times, Trebuchet or Verdana). For large files, we recommend using a free file hosting service such as yousendit.com

How to adjust ink levels
Open the Separations Preview window and set the View to Ink Limit. Set the limit to 240%. Areas of your file which are over the ink limit will be highlighted in red. Converting to the correct ICC profile is often sufficient to bring down the ink levels within the acceptable range. See: Which colour profile should I use? To ajust the ink levels on a vector object, check your Color panel. All elements of your file should be in CMYK. If you add up the values for Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and blacK, the total should not exceed 240; reduce the level of each colour until their sum is 240 or less. Adjusting raster images without the use of an expensive colour management software requires a lot of trial and error. If you would like some assistance, please email the file to our graphic artist at addesign@dailypublications.org

How to modify the file resolution
The file’s resolution is listed under its size in Image > Image Size… If the resolution is lower than 300 DPI (pixels/inch) and the size of the file is larger than the ad size you have booked, you can try sacrificing some of its area for a resolution increase (bringing the dots closer together as the image shrinks in size). Uncheck the Resample Image box (leaving the previous two options checked). Change the resolution to 300 pixels/inch and see how it affects the image’s inch size. Does it make it too small for your needs? If so, you can use the down arrow to lower the resolution value until the inch size becomes acceptable, making sure not to let it drop below 200 pixels/inch. If your file contains rasterized text (see: how to keep vector text), 300 pixels/inch is the only option for you; anything less would cause your text to blur.

How to keep vector text
If your text was written directly in Photoshop, simply leave it on a separate layer and do not rasterize it. If you use a special font (something other than Arial, Times, Helvetica, Verdana or Trebuchet), email the font file (usually a .ttf file) directly to our graphic artist at addesign@dailypublications.org If your text is part of a vector file that was imported into Photoshop (e.g. Smart Object pasted from Illustrator), just leave it on a separate layer. Do not rasterize the layer, merge it with anything or flatten it. Send your original file (preferably as a .psd) to addesign@dailypublications.org (for large files, we recommend using a file upload service such as yousendit.com). Do not flatten the artwork before sending us the file!

Images
All non-vector images should be in high resolution (300 DPI). See: What does Vector mean? | How do I know if my file is in high resolution?

Fonts
If you are using a special font (something other than Arial, Times, Helvetica, Verdana or Trebuchet), please email the font file (usually a .ttf file) directly to our graphic artist at addesign@dailypublications.org Note that we will use your Powerpoint file for visual reference only; your ad will be remade according to our technical specifications. For this reason, embedding the fonts into Powerpoint will not help, as we will not be able to extract them to use in the final file. If you cannot provide the font file, we will select a different font from our library.

Images
All non-vector images should be in high resolution (300 DPI). (See: How do I know if my file is in high resolution?) If you insert clip art, avoid using Photographs. Note that not all clip art is vector. If your file uses a low resolution raster image, we will attempt to convert it to a vector. This may alter the look of your image.

Fonts
If you are using a special font (something other than Arial, Times, Helvetica, Verdana or Trebuchet), please email the font file (usually a .ttf file) directly to our graphic artist at addesign@dailypublications.org Note that we will use your Word file for visual reference only; your ad will be remade according to our technical specifications. For this reason, embedding the fonts into Word will not help, as we will not be able to extract them to use in the final file. If you cannot provide the font file, we will select a different font from our library.